Selma 50 years later: Remembering Bloody Sunday

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Read more at latimes.com/selma.

“They came with horses,” Amelia Boynton Robinson recalled. “They came with nightsticks.”

On March 7, 1965, Alabama state troopers blocked civil rights demonstrators who had just crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma. Boynton Robinson, then a middle-aged black woman, was tear-gassed and beaten and slumped unconscious on the side of the road. The troopers attacked the marchers in events that became known as “Bloody Sunday.”

Learn more about the woman now called “Queen Mother” and join us for a look back at the historical Civil Rights Movement and a look ahead at the modern movement 50 years after Selma at latimes.com/selma.

Photographs courtesy of

James “Spider” Martin Photographic Archive
UT Austin’s Briscoe Center for American History

AP Photo Archive

Jim Gavenus

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1 Los Angeles

Los Angeles News & Search

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